Skip to main content
Teacher Portal
  • 8 - 15 years old
  • 45 minutes - 3 hours, 15 minutes
  • Intermediate
Preview image

Description

  • Students are asked to program their robot to act on conditionals and create a User Interface (UI).

Key Concepts

  • Programing Conditionals

  • Robot Behaviors

  • Analytical Thinking

Objectives

  • Apply building directions in a multistep procedure to assemble the VEX IQ Clawbot to complete a specific task.

  • Identify the benefits of using conditional programming structures within a project.

  • Identify how [If then] and [If then else] blocks affect program flow.

  • Identify types of User Interfaces (UIs).

  • Explain the Boolean condition of each branch of the [If then else] block.

  • Apply pseudocode to the design of their project to sort out an algorithm for programming the interface.

  • Apply conditional programming to create a solution to the challenge of letting users control the Clawbot with a three-button interface (up arrow, down arrow, and check) in order to pick up items from a table.

Materials needed

  • 1 or more VEX IQ Super Kits

  • Aluminum can, empty water bottle, and other durable objects for lifting

  • Engineering notebook

  • A stopwatch or any device that can track a minute of time

Facilitation Notes

  • Ensure all required parts for the build are available prior to starting this STEM Lab.

  • Make sure that there is ample space in the classroom to measure out and tape the layout for the User Interface Challenge.

  • Make sure that your robot is configured properly. If your robot is configured differently, you can make adjustments in the Robot Config view of VEXcode IQ.

  • If multiple students will be downloading their saved project to the same robot, have the students add their initials to the name of the saved project (For example, "Forward and Backward_MW"). This way students can find and make adjustments to their projects and not others.

  • An engineering notebook can be as simple as lined paper within a folder or binder. The notebook shown is a more sophisticated example that is available through VEX Robotics.

  • Students can share their pseudocode with the teacher for feedback prior to creating the project for feedback.

  • The approximate pacing of each section of the Stem Lab is as follows: Seek- 65 minutes, Play- 45 minutes, Apply- 15 minutes, Rethink- 65 minutes, Know- 5 minutes.

Further Your Learning

  • Many physical (button-driven) User Interfaces (UIs) have been replaced by Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs). Have students investigate commonly used devices (keypads, phones, calculators, computers) that have transitioned from button-driven UIs to icon-driven GUIs. What are the benefits/costs?

Educational Standards

Standards for Technological Literacy (STL)

  • 9.H Modeling, testing, evaluating, and modifying are used to transform ideas into practical solutions (Rethink)

  • 11.I Make a product or system and document the solution (Rethink)

Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)

  • HS-ETS1-2 Design a solution to a complex real-world problem by breaking it down into smaller, more manageable problems that can be solved through engineering (decomposition of project - Rethink)

Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA)

  • 1B-AP-10 Create programs that include sequences, events, loops, and conditionals (Play and Rethink)

  • 2-AP-10 Use flowcharts and/or pseudocode to address complex problems as algorithms (Rethink)

  • 2-AP-12 Design and iteratively develop programs that combine control structures, including nested loops and compound conditionals (Rethink)

  • 2-AP-19 Document programs in order to make them easier to follow, test, and debug (Rethink)

  • 3A-AP-13: Create prototypes that use algorithms to solve computational problems by leveraging prior student knowledge and personal interests.

  • 3A-AP-16: Design and iteratively develop computational artifacts for practical intent, personal expression, or to address a societal issue by using events to initiate instructions.

  • 3A-AP-17: Decompose problems into smaller components through systematic analysis, using constructs such as procedures, modules, and/or objects.

  • 3A-AP-22: Design and develop computational artifacts working in team roles using collaborative tools.

Common Core State Standards (CCSS)

  • 1B-AP-10 Create programs that include sequences, events, loops, and conditionals (Play and Rethink)

  • 2-AP-10 Use flowcharts and/or pseudocode to address complex problems as algorithms (Rethink)

  • 2-AP-12 Design and iteratively develop programs that combine control structures, including nested loops and compound conditionals (Rethink)

  • 2-AP-19 Document programs in order to make them easier to follow, test, and debug (Rethink)

  • 3A-AP-13: Create prototypes that use algorithms to solve computational problems by leveraging prior student knowledge and personal interests.

  • 3A-AP-16: Design and iteratively develop computational artifacts for practical intent, personal expression, or to address a societal issue by using events to initiate instructions.

  • 3A-AP-17: Decompose problems into smaller components through systematic analysis, using constructs such as procedures, modules, and/or objects.

  • 3A-AP-22: Design and develop computational artifacts working in team roles using collaborative tools.

Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS)

  • 126.40.c.5.A Develop algorithms to control a robot, including applying instructions, collecting sensor data, and performing simple tasks.

  • 126.40.c.5.C Create algorithms that provide interaction with a robot.

  • 126.40.c.5.G Apply decision-making strategies when developing solutions.

  • 126.40.c.3.G Document a final design and solution.

  • 126.40.c.3.H Present a final design, testing results, and solution.